You Can Help Greg Murphy Make Some Music

Pianist/composer Greg Murphy has a drive going on to help with new album:

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Michael Jefrey Stevens European Tour

Exciting new tour dates from pianist Michael Jefrey Stevens. Be sure to catch him where you can.

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JORIS TEEPE 5TET at Smalls Jazz Club, Wednesday, June 17, 2015 @ 7.30 PM.

Tribute to Rashied Ali

Rashied Ali is most commonly recognized as John Coltrane’s drummer on Interstellar Space (Impulse!, 1967). He was also a  significant participant in the New York loft-jazz movement by opening “Ali’s Alley in 1973.

Joris Teepe worked for 9 years with the legendary drummer, for this tribute he will be joined by band mates Lawrence Clark, Greg Murphy and Josh Evans. Shinnosuke Takahashi will be on drums. The repertoire is composed by Rashied Ali, Joris Teepe, Greg Murphy and Lawrence Clark.


at Smalls Jazz Club
183 West 10th Street NYC
Cover $20, start 7.30 PM

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Ornette Coleman Will Be Missed

Possessed of restless exploration & genius the importance of his work can never be overstated. Out of the many  concerts I have attended in my life all of his were easily among the most memorable.

NY Times Obituary for Ornette Coleman

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Orrin Keepnews Has Died at 91

The New York Times announced today that Orrin Keepnews, Jazz Producer and Record Executive, is dead at 91.

You can read their article here:

He was an amazing figure in Jazz history.  Heartfelt condolences to his family, friends and fans.

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Greg Murphy: Blues for Miles

She told me to always shake everything out, towels, clothes and shoes, before using them as the spiders made temporary homes in the creases of things at night attracted by the warmth. I did not know how much veracity there was in this but the other morning while shaving I had seen a spider crawl out of the skirt that she had left on the bathroom floor.

Her sister was sick and she had to go and help her out. Occasionally it is good to sweetly suffer the blues induced by finding oneself alone. The rawness makes all sensations both good and bad more acute and the inherent poetics of everything rise to the fore.

Late at night, two empty bottles clang. It is the pantomime of an amour as the bag that they are in comes to rest on some side street next to a dumpster. Footfalls like applause, the last man left in the theater who refuses to leave until he is sure that he has seen everything.

I wondered if thoughts could have a sound. And if they did, would they vary from person to person? To be even more specific, did the type of thought dictate its sound? For the erotic, a breeze like sigh, work, the metallic clang of a steam driven piston.

While just a cerebral meandering to while away what hours remained until dawn, it did present the concept of the personal/universal aspects of a thing. This concept could easily be applied to art. The best art in any medium shares this property. It is embraced and treasured by many over the course of generations yet for each person, it has somewhat of an individualized meaning which resonates in a personal way.

Miles Davis (May 26, 1926 – September 28, 1991) is one artist whose oeuvre has touched many people deeply and personally. His many fans can all agree on his greatness yet the reason why varies for each person. Blues for Miles by pianist/arranger Greg Murphy offers up evidence of this personal/universal effect.

The album is no mere stylistic homage but a way in which to show some of what Miles meant to him not via the work’s structure but rather in mood and spirit. The album’s program is a mix of standards and originals which along with the band’s interplay keeps things interesting.

“My Shinning Hour” starts the album off. This standard from the pen of perennial Great American Songbook scribes Harold Arlen and Johnny Mercer was originally for the film “The Sky’s the Limit” (1943) but is probably best known to jazz fans through the John Coltrane cover. John Coltrane’s version from the album Coltrane Jazz (Atlantic Records 1961) marked the first appearance on record of his classic quartet.

Greg eschews any comparison by injecting heavy Bossa Nova inflections. With a fat mid-range tone the trumpet maintains the familiar melody while all around him dances percussion and drum flourishes. The perfect foil which meshes with the horn while not becoming merely a twin is the low end bass groove. The piano breaks are lyrical and like the rest of the song, fun. Punctuated with whistle and percussion breaks one finds themselves suddenly thinking of carnival and the softly murmured innuendos of the sun.

“Brother Can You Spare a Dime?” is taken as a solo piece. It shows the contemplative aspect of Greg’s playing. Written by E.Y Harburg and Jay Gorney (1930) for the musical Americana it was in the vernacular of the depression, portraying the broken possibilities of the once seemingly limitless potential for every American. Despite the Republican right thinking it “Red” propaganda and trying to have it cut from the show it remained and continued on well after the depression in the lexicon of great standards.

Greg is no stranger to this song having previously (2012) recorded it as the theme song for the HBO documentary “Redemption”.   We all get down but not every musician can play the blues. Greg displays an authenticity not in any specific blues-based structure but in an organic soulfulness.

There is a power to the performance deriving from simplicity which is not meant in a pejorative way. Any attempt at doing a deconstruction or re-imagining are avoided in favor of a straight reading which allows the song’s inherent power and Greg’s voice to come through unadorned and without any distraction. Tinged with melancholy but bearable on account of its beauty, it is a rainy day with all the leaves of the trees dripping silvered jewels.

“Hat Trick” is another original. It is free jazz not in the genre sense but in the band allowing different components from several genres to meld without concern of adhering to any specific formula. The band on this album is comprised of musicians with whom Greg has a history, having played together in various incarnations. This song has a slow burn, offering up permanent evidence of how much fun the ensemble would be in a live situation.

The start of the song finds the bass releasing deep drone like pulses. The brush and cymbal work on the percussion is the whispered encouragement to do something interesting and in nocturnal colors. When the piano initially enters, softly, it sounds almost akin to an older model keyboard so valued by today’s turnbulists. Soon though it is metamorphosis into grander, fractured ivories playing in elliptical patterns which mirror that of the bass, punctuating its own pattern with rapid asides.

The trumpet and tenor saxophone are two long things which entangle even as the stretch out, wisps of smoke, coils of rope or deeply abstracted thoughts. As the piece continues on the front line of horns separate with the trumpet then tenor taking solos which would not sound out of place on the Impulse label of the 1960’s.

A dramatic cohesiveness is created not because all the musicians play in unison but because each of the smaller patterns executed within the piece bolster the others.

This album is no mere tribute nor does it seek to concern itself with offering up the next artistic evolutionary step. Instead it displays what inspirations one generation of artists gleamed from another. An informal meditation on the enjoyment from works that we find ourselves constantly going back to, something which we can all relate to in our own way.

Maxwell Chandler


More information on Greg:


Not for use without permission.

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Help Subway Moon Get To Hamburg

The Institute for Collaborative Education is a small public alternative middle/high school in Manhattan that attracts families of all incomes from across the city. Its music department is run by professional jazz musician and poet, Roy Nathanson. Roy’s songwriting class has been invited to perform their original songs in Hamburg, Germany, April 19-27 at the Youngstar Theater Festival. Many other young performers from all over the world will be joining them in a cross-cultural exchange. The festival will pay all of their expenses once they get to Hamburg. This Kickstarter campaign is to raise money for airfare. Parents are all paying what they can afford towards this goal, but many cannot afford the full fare. It’s the opportunity of a lifetime—please support them.

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